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Congresswoman Debbie Dingell

Representing the 12th District of Michigan

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Dingell, Local Experts Hold Healthcare Forum in Dearborn

July 3, 2018
Press Release

DEARBORN, MI – U.S. Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (MI-12) and local experts today held a town hall on the state of healthcare and pre-existing conditions coverage and what it means for people in Michigan. Dingell was joined by Marianne Udow-Phillips, Executive Director at the Center for Healthcare Research & Transformation, Mary Zatina, Senior Vice President of Government Relations at Beaumont Health, and Shari Navetta, Advocacy Chair at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation of Southeast Michigan.

Dingell live streamed the event on her Facebook page. Photos from the event are available here.

“Whether I’m at a townhall or the grocery store, in Ann Arbor or Downriver, I hear from people who are scared to death about the potential loss of pre-existing conditions coverage,” said Congresswoman Debbie Dingell. “We cannot go back to days that people with diabetes, high blood pressure or heart issues have to fear being denied insurance or premiums to high they cannot afford them. There’s so much happening, but it’s important we keep talking about changes happening in healthcare and what it means for families in Michigan. When you live in America, you have a right to affordable, quality healthcare. Congress must work to improve – not dismantle – the Affordable Care Act.”

"At Beaumont, we believe that the most important aspect of delivering care is ensuring our patients have full and robust access to care and health insurance. The ACA helps us help people. It's the doorway to better care, better value and healthier lives and it offers protections for pre-existing conditions and protections for children,” said Mary Zatina, Senior Vice President of Government Relations at Beaumont Health. “The ACA is not perfect but it has provided access to care where there was none before, and we should build off these gains rather than moving backwards."

“Recent changes to the Affordable Care Act have been destabilizing to the individual market in many ways.  2018 premiums in Michigan increased an average of 26.7% in large part because of federal regulatory changes and uncertainty about the future of the ACA.” said Marianne Udow-Phillips, Executive Director for the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation at the University of Michigan. “ In particular, there were payments owed to health plans that the Administration decided not to pay that significantly contributed to the large premium increases. While, premium increases in 2019 look to be much lower, future increases are likely as a result of  things like the repeal of the tax penalty for people who don’t have health insurance which is a problem because it means that people have less incentive to buy health insurance and those insured are more likely to be sicker which makes costs go up actually for everyone.”

“It is imperative that people with Type One Diabetes have access to affordable, quality and predictable healthcare coverage. Keeping themselves healthy and in range every day is stressful enough without the added burden of wondering if they will be able to afford the supplies and insulin they need to live,” said Shari Navetta, Advocacy Chair at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation of Southeast Michigan.

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